Category Archives: Books

FIVE WAYS TO GET FASTER by Olympian Jeff Galloway


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Longer Long Runs

Increasing the length of the longest long run has produced the greatest amount of improvement that I’ve seen among my coaching clients.  Several surveys have shown more than 13 minutes of time improvement when runners increase their longest long run from 20 miles to 26 miles before a marathon.  Comparable time improvements are experienced in 10K runners and half marathoners when they increase their long runs above race distance as noted in my YEAR ROUND PLAN book that covers all the distances.  Long runs must be at least 2 min/mi slower than current ability, with liberal walk breaks.  The slower the pace, the quicker the recovery.  I suggest doing the long runs every 2-3 weeks.

Speed Repetitions—increasing the number

My runners have improved by an average of over 6 minutes in a marathon (3+ minutes in a half marathon) by increasing the number of speed repetitions to 14 x 1 mile for the marathon, and 14 x 800 meter for the half marathon.  I recommend that each of these be run 30 sec/mi faster than goal pace.  The recovery interval is a 5 min walk between miles and a 3 minute walk between 800’s.  These workouts prepare one to maintain or pick up pace at the end of the goal race, instead of slowing down.  See GALLOWAY TRAINING PROGRAMS & HALF MARATHON books for details (www.RunInjuryFree.com).

Improve Running Form

Most runners I’ve monitored have improved several minutes in a marathon by fine-tuning their running form.  As the mechanics become smoother and within one’s limits, there is a significant reduction in aches, pains and injuries.  The two best ways to improve form are water running and cadence drills.
•   Water running uses the same basic motion as when running on land, using a flotation device so that the feet don’t touch the bottom of the pool.  When done for at least 15 minutes, once a week, the legs find a more efficient path through the water—eliminating extraneous motion.
•   The cadence drill is done for 30 seconds, counting the number of times the foot touches the ground.  This drill is detailed in most of my books.  I’ve found the key to improving speed on the mechanical side is quicker turnover.

 Race in Shorter Events

Dropping down a standard distance or two can improve your mechanics for running faster and your ability to handle a higher level of oxygen debt.  On non-long-run weekends, during a half marathon program, try some 5K or 10K races.  When training for a marathon, race at the 10K or half marathon distance.  At first, the faster pace of the shorter distance may seem awkward.  But after several short races, you will adapt—especially if you do some speed training for the shorter/faster event.  These performance improvements can translate into faster times in the longer distances.  My book 5K/10K details the training and the racing strategies for these events.

Hill Training

The only way I’ve found to build strength for running is to run hill repeats.  On a moderate grade hill, start at a jog and pick up the turnover rate of the feet and legs as you go up the hill, shortening your stride.  Walk down the hill for recovery.  Don’t sprint, and follow the other hill training guidelines in my books and at www.RunInjuryFree.com.  The strength from hill training will allow you to perform better in speed sessions which will help you improve in your goal race.  You’ll also run faster on hilly courses, during your races.


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Save NOW and register for the Jeff Galloway 13.1 and Barb’s 5K.  Prices increases tomorrow May 2nd!  Don’t let your readers miss out on these savings! Register now at http://www.jeffgalloway131.com.

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Listen and share this great podcast “Jeff Galloway’s Tips For Beginner Runners” with Mark Kennedy from Healthynomics!  From how Jeff got running to breathing while you run; it’s all here!

 

Have a great weekend and happy running!

As a Galloway blogger,  I’ve been provided tips by Jeff Galloway to share with my readers.  There is no compensation for this post.

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Jeff Galloway’s Training and Motivation Tips


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Olympian Jeff Galloway

I was absolutely thrilled to find out recently that I had been chosen to participate as a Jeff Galloway Blogger! I’ve used his run/walk methods in the past and then trained strictly for my last marathon (more on that in another post!) that was on January 25, 2015 using run/walk intervals and I set a PR!!

By being a Jeff Galloway Blogger, I’ll have the opportunity to share valuable information with you on training straight from Jeff weekly!

Here are some tips from Jeff this week:

Training and Motivation Tips

by Olympian Jeff Galloway

  • When paced correctly, running delivers the best attitude boost you can get. Sustain this by pacing yourself gently during the first mile or three.

 

  • A well-paced run enhances vitality for the rest of the day.  Start each run at least 30 seconds a mile slower than you will run at the end.

 

  • If you have a Run Walk Run strategy that is right for you on that day, it’s possible to feel good after every run-even the marathon.

 

  • Running is the best stress reliever I’ve found. Research shows that running tends to activate the conscious brain which over-rides the emotional subconscious brain and manages the negative and anxiety hormones during and after the run.

 

  • Research shows that as runners get faster, their stride length shortens.  A quicker cadence is the mechanical key to faster running.

 

  • The finishing of a run that is longer than you’ve run in the last 3 weeks can bestow a sense of achievement that is unique and empowering-due to positive brain circuits that are turned on.

 

  • You can’t run a long run too slowly or take too many walk breaks.  You’ll get the same endurance based upon the distance covered.

Olympian Jeff Galloway has coached over a million runners to their goals through his clinics, wonderful retreats, training programs, books and e-coaching.  Sign up for his free newsletter at www.JeffGalloway.com. You can also find more information by going to http://www.runinjuryfree.com.

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March 22, 2015 – Rome Marathon 26.2, 13.1 and 5K distances
Book and save up to $200 at www.RunITALY.comOffer expires 2/14/15.

Have a great Tuesday!

 As a Galloway blogger,  I’ve been provided tips by Jeff Galloway to share with my readers.  There is no compensation for this post.

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Filed under Blogging, Books, Fitness, Jeff Galloway Blogger, Marathon, Racing, Running

Q & A with Eric Orton – Elite Running Coach, Author and ZOZI Guru


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Photo Courtesy of ZOZI

 

Recently, I had the opportunity to do an interview with Eric Orton, who you may remember from the New York Time’s best selling book Born to Run. Eric is author to his new book The Cool Impossible and is an “Elite Guru” for ZOZI, a company that helps people live active lifestyles by connecting them to amazing experiences and outdoor gear. I first met Eric when he was on the Born to Run book tour with Christopher McDougall and Scott Jurek in 2011. I was so excited to get the chance to get a chance to ask him about his new book and his partnership with ZOZI! (Enter here to win Eric’s dream Nicaraguan adventure!)

SITNF:
Hi Eric! It’s so great to speak with you again. The last time I had the chance to talk with you was during the Born to Run tour when you stopped in Hattiesburg, MS for a run, speaking engagement and book signing in April 2011. (Read more about this.) Since that time, it looks as though you’ve been very busy! Tell me about your new book The Cool Impossible
ERIC:
It has actually been pretty crazy since day one of Born To Run and one of our best stops was Hattiesburg.  Running thru the city with some many runners was so great and everyone was so amped to have us there.  And now I am really excited about my book, which was released here in the US in hard copy last May and I am not preparing for the paperback launch scheduled for May 2014.
The nuts and bolts of the book is run strength, beginning with a foundation of foot strength. Foot strength is so important and an aspect of training no one thinks about.  Through my years as a coach, I have come to see that the health and performance of a runner is dictated by how well they use their feet and we can train this.  For example, a runner with flat feet can train and develop a natural stabilizing arch which then dictates how the legs and hips are stabilized while running. So two things are happening here, we are training the feet to be stronger and stable, and we are training the feet to promote better muscle activation and recruitment all the way up the leg to the hips/glutes. The great thing is these exercises are very potent but can be done anywhere with the use of very simple equipment and do not take very much time to perform. They work great as a pre-run warm-up.
 The book proceeds to run form and skill of technique that we all can gain something from to improve.  Combining feet strength and good form, we begin to develop what I call muscle equilibrium and when we get on this path we begin to alleviate the tug and pull on opposing muscles that causes the typical tightness most runners experience.  We should not be this tight as runners and we can strive for this and it doesn’t happen thru stretching.
The program then moves to run training with the use of heart rate and speed training zones.  I chart out a simple testing protocol for runners to perform so they can design their own personal training zones so they are always working and running at their own ability, it takes the guess work out of what to do.  With this I provide a two-phase foundational run program for runners to follow.
 Just as I feel there is a best way to strength train and run, I too believe there is a best way to eat and THINK.  So there is a nutrition chapter that ultimately is a challenge to readers to become the athlete they want to becoming and put some strategies into place.  This includes fueling strategies for training and racing, and also some coaching guidance to take their body to the next level.
 I picked the title, The Cool Impossible, because ultimately this book is a challenge.  I am a coach and it is my passion and mission to help runners become better than they think is possible and the final component to this is dealing with how we think that affects our actions.  I really believe there is a best way to think to perform our best and get out of life what we want.  This can be done just like a training program for say running, so I have spelled out a mind training program to follow to help become better and performing in running and life, and to set the reader on the path of developing their own cool impossible goal.
9780451416339_large_The_Cool_Impossible1SITNF:
2.Tell us about the company Zozi and your involvement with them?
ERIC:
I was fortunate enough to be one of the original ZOZI Gurus and now to be associated with the likes of Bear Grylls, Jimmy Chin and others, is truly humbling and an honor. ZOZI is all about adventure and living life to the fullest everyday and this is a very authentic way of being that we both share. I believe that running and Adventure travel brings people and cultures together and is truly a unifying force and this is what ZOZI wants people to experience on their own.  ZOZI is the catalyst and care takers of this adventure mindset and what life is all about. ZOZI is changing how people look at adventure and what is possible.  More importantly, ZOZI makes the everyday person believe they can experience and participate in epic adventures.  ZOZI is an adventure travel coach and guide.

SITNF:
3. What can you tell my readers about the shoes that you and your B2R team have developed?
ERIC:
B2R has had a road shoe out in the market now for about a year and we are now ready for follow this up with a new trail shoe, a casual moc, and a gym training shoe.  One of my goals in the over all design of the shoes was to have a shoe that fits the majority of foot types, wide, narrow and in between and we really nailed this.  We use a split toe design, separating the big toe from the other four toes.  This helps promote a very natural environment for the foot and also creates a unique fit because the shoe becomes part of your foot due to the wrapping of the upper from the split toe.  We also worked extremely hard on developing a really great last. The last is the 3D way it fits the foot – or essential how it feels.  Aside from the great performing characteristics of the shoe design, I feel we really nailed the last and how comfortable and natural the shoe fits.  We have had really great interest and feedback world-wide and I am look forward to the release of the 3 new shoes in February of 2014.  
SITNF:
4. I understand that you have an adventure trip to Nicaragua in the works. Can you tell my readers more about that?
ERIC:
I actually traveled to Nicaragua last February as an invited runner to the Fuego y Agua Ultramarathon race hosted on Ometepe Island.  This trip blew my mind.  I run mountains all the time, but this was my first exposure to running up a volcano that is still active.  Ometepe Island was like our own little Gilligan’s Island.  The food was eclectic, with many great restaurants and it was one of those situations where once you found that restaurant you liked, you kept going back night after night.  The chef recognizes you as well as all the help and it became “your” restaurant and island.
Having the ability to immerse in an island culture, eat amazing food, and be exposed to some of the most diverse terrain and landscape , running up volcanoes, with monkeys, thru jungles, and reenforced how adventure brings people and cultures together.  As part of the ZOZI 12 days of Adventure, we wanted to put together a similar adventure that I experienced in Nicaragua.  Nicaragua is so diverse and layered in culture, history, and unique landscapes that really provides a one of a kind experience.  This really speaks to what ZOZI is all about, finding those unique experiences that are a little out of the way but that are life enhancing to anyone.
Source: Courtesy of ZOZI

Source: Courtesy of ZOZI

 
SITNF:
5. Do you have any other running adventure trips on the horizon?
ERIC:
Well, I just got back from a 3 day Grand Canyon expedition and I am fortunate enough to live in Jackson Hole, where everyday is literally an adventure. Today I went for a long run and saw 4 bald eagles, a heard of bison, and traded howls with a pack of wolves.  For 2014, I am looking to attend a few of the new US Skyrunning race series and have a project set for the Wind River mountain range, and ultimately I am in the processes of trying to get to the Himalayas next Fall for a run expedition.
I am in the beginning stages of some secret projects in the UK and New Zealand, so as they say, stay tuned.
 
SITNF:
6. Have you had a chance to run lately with your Born to Run companions?
ERIC:
I actually had a great run with Chris McDougall this past Spring in Central Park.  He attended my NYC book launch that included a great group run prior to our talk, similar to what we did in Hattiesburg.  I have run with Scott Jurek a few times during Born To Run events and have seen Ted at various events and hope to see him in Seattle this Spring.  And, one day I plan to bug Billy over in Hawaii.
 
SITNF:
7. My husband and I do all of our long runs for marathon training together. We typically run at different paces when we run separately. (He’s really fast and I’m slow.) Because I’m slower, he obviously runs at my pace. I’ve always heard that it doesn’t matter how slow you run your long runs. Is this as effective if he does his shorter speed work and interval runs on his own?
ERIC:
I think this is OK early in the season for him to run slower on your long runs, but ultimately, as he approaches the last 8-10 weeks, it would be good to replace some of these longer runs with some race pace intensity to increase his strength/speed endurance.  But this is also something he could do with you.  After you warm up together, he could take off for 20-40 min and turn around and run back to you.  Or give you a head start and have him try and catch you.  You do not want to do a long race pace effort run every week, so I would mix it up.  Some runs, he does his own thing and others you two get creative by manipulated the challenge for each other.
During the early season when you are running together, it would also be good for both of you to do some 10-20 second fast efforts scattered throughout the run.  This helps develop leg speed and trains the neuromuscular path ways that are so important. AND, this could be an easy way for both of you to get in some quality while still remaining together.
 
SITNF:
8. Sometimes we get really tired of taking in the same fuel on our long runs. Do you have any suggestions that would shake things up for us or is there something that’s your go to snack?
ERIC:
In my book I talk a lot about sugar and how we might rely too much on sugar in general, but also in training.  So, something that you could really change up in the early season while you are building your long EASY run is to go without fueling.  Now this needs to be an easy run and you want to have something to eat before you start, but by limiting or not fueling at all during these build up long runs, you begin to train your body to utilize fat as fuel.  Fat is our best source of energy and this is something we can train our body’s to become more efficient burning fat as fuel.  
I would also try eating more good fats/protein before a run and see how this helps you need less during the long run and eventually when you do need fuel for the long run, look for a balanced approach that contains some fat/protein and carbs, not just heavy in the sugar.  I use PocketFuel for all my long runs when I need fuel and it gives me a satisfied feeling with sustained energy that lasts so much longer than sugar based products.  And once you get used to this feeling, you might notice that all of the sugar we normally take in when fueling, causes more bonking than a balanced approach.  I am not sure what you typically do, but you might also experiment with a variety of nuts and dried fruit.
 
SITNF:
9. My blog is made up of readers that are of all different skill levels. Do you have any suggestions for someone that’s just getting started as a new runner?
ERIC:
In The Cool Impossible, I start out by saying I believe at first, the mind follows a good body.  Sometimes we often hear it the other way around, where the body follows the mind.  But from my experience as a coach and athlete, it is hard to feel good about yourself mentally if you are not feeling good physically.  So, at first, the body must get strong and well and this promotes mental confidence and empowerment.  Through time, this starts to alter and as we become strong and capable physically, the mind takes over and leads the way. So my advice to new runners, first and foremost, is that running is good for us if done right.  Yes, it is a skill to be learned and one that we all can learn.  And, running can be fun and getting to the point in your running where YOU have the ability to manage your effort is the holy grail for new runners.  With this, I really think it is crucial for them to understand appropriate run intensity and effort.  This will help keep efforts as easy as possible when first starting so it stays enjoyable and something you gain power from, not torture.  This will promote consistency and will help running to be FUN – leading to that physical confidence I mention above. In fact all runners need to understand intensity for long-term improvement.  One simple way to understand what I mean by understand intensity and having the ability to manage your effort would be to go for a run and only breathe through your nose.  Run as easy as you can to achieve this and when the effort because too much where you can no longer breath only through your nose, stop and walk until you can resume running again.  Continue this pattern so you are only running when breathing through your nose.  Through time, you will improve your ability to run longer and longer nose breathing.  This keeps the effort manageable and helps the newbie’s body adjust easier to that initial phase of beginning running.  This will then help you be able to manage effort breathing normally thru your mouth.
 
SITNF:
10. Do you have any suggestions for the more advanced runners who have been running for a while and want to get faster but seem to have plateaued?
ERIC:
As a coach, I always look for what is missing when a runner is plateauing or when they simply just want to get better and faster.  With veteran runners, we tend to slowly slip into a routine of what we enjoy doing and what we are good at.  Where this becomes an issue is we stop challenging our body and ability.  So I would recommend to change it up.  If you are a marathoner, train specifically for a few 5k races.  Or on the opposite end, up your training volume if you have been keeping your weekly volume static for some time. But ultimately, to get faster, we need to get faster and this means we need to get faster running a mile in distance.  This mile time is a predictor of ability across the endurance spectrum and if you can improve your mile time, you will be faster at your chosen race distance.  And this mile time will also help you get a sense for your training paces at other distances and I have charted all of this out in my book.  Your mile test allows you to customize your program based on your own speed ability and takes the guess-work out of how fast to run for a given workout – which ultimately will really improve performance.
 
SITNF:
11. We really like using Chia Seeds since reading about them in Born to Run. Are there any other natural foods that you would recommend that boost your running performance?
ERIC:
I love chia as well and typically use it prior to running and as a recovery aid.  I think the key to any performance boost is consistency.  Just like in running, the more frequently we can run, the better we performance.  I think nutrition is the same way.  So to answer your question, I feel it is very important to avoid refine sugar and eat as clean and natural as possible on a daily basis. This consistency is what ultimately leads to high performance and all of the great athletes have a defined and structured philosophy of how they eat and fuel. So I suggest runners develop a day-to-day philosophy and strategy that works for them.  One of my sayings is, self-discipline is the ultimate form of performance, and I really believe this is true when it comes to nutrition.  
As I mentioned above, I would also look towards natural fat sources as a way to experiment with performance boosts.  At first, try eating more natural fats before your long runs and then look to add them during and see what happens…
 
SITNF:
12. How did you get your start in running?
ERIC:
I was an athlete very early on in life.  My primary sport growing up was actually football. I was a running back and played at the college level and also have a sprinting background which helped forge my run form philosophy and techniques.  After college I moved West to Colorado and became immersed in the endurance scene, racing bikes, running in the mountains, and racing ultras.  It was at this point when I first became aware of the Tarahumara Indians, when they ran in the Leadville 100.  So in some form or fashion, running is the one thing I have done most of my life, with my first memories way back in third grade field day races.
 
SITNF:
13. My readers come from all different climates and environments. Do you have suggestions that you’d like to share about how to deal with the different elements such as heat/humidity, cold/snow/, rain, high elevations, etc.?
ERIC:
I coach athletes around the world and they all bring diverse environmental challenges.  When it comes to heat, humidity and altitude challenges, always the best formula is to be as fit as possible.  This will always be the biggest help when you are training for a race in this environment when you might not be used to the challenges.  With this, you can certainly help yourself by getting as much experience in the heat or altitude as you can.  But again, put most of your energy to becoming as fit as you can without over training.
When I was training for my Nicaragua race, it was full-on winter here in Jackson and I was expecting to experience a 90-100 degree change in temperature.  To help prepare, I would visit the sauna as much as I could during the week to get my body used to sweating and being exposed to the heat.
When racing at altitude or in the heat, you will need to adjust your effort, especially early on as performance will be effected.  So, it is best to be patient and conservative and as the race develops, intuitively adjust based on your training experiences.  And of course, hydration will play a big roll both at altitude and heat.  Be sure to focus on getting in your electrolytes as your ability to hydrate is effected by your sodium intake, not the other way around.
When it comes to the cold, snow, and rain where the challenge is more mental, I feel it is super important to have run goals during this time or you will find a darn good excuse not to get out in the elements.  But if you have a good goal, one that has you motivated and maybe even a little fearful, this will help you get out the door consistently.
Another great tip for bad weather is to get creative and make an adventure out of your run.  Make sure you have good clothing to help combat the weather, and then get out in it and run some place new or run to breakfast or wake up in the middle of the night and throw a headlamp on and experience your neighborhood from a different perspective.  But ultimately, I believe the goal is the key.
 
SITNF:
14. How does a marathon runner begin making the transition from marathon runner to ultra runner?
ERIC:
It doesn’t take as much as you might think. I would tackle this by progression.  Start with a 50k or even a shorter trail race distance that might still take you as long or longer to complete than your road marathon time.  I would also focus on developing more run strength, which includes the foot and leg strength philosophy I discussed above and true run strength by performing hill sprints and getting on trails and hills as much as you can for long runs. 
The challenges of ultras become more about the mental perseverance AND managing nutrition and a good fueling strategy.  Many times a good day comes down to a good nutrition day and this is what is really different about making the jump in distance.  So with this, the best approach is to get out there and gain experience running longer. This can be done in training and in racing.  Make it a progression, start with a 50k and then go to a 50 miler, then on to 100k and so forth.  Progress your race distance just like you would progress your long run, a little at a time.  Thru this experience, you will gain more insight on what works nutritionally and at the same time training your body to adapt to longer running.  I would not recommend jumping right to the 100 milers.  Let your body adjust, you will have  a much better experience.
Another key difference is understand appropriate pacing and intensities for these longer distances.  Typically ultras are done on trails and on varied terrain and this presents a challenge in pacing.  So do a lot of training on similar terrain, always monitoring your effort and speed so you are gaining knowledge and do a lot of walking/trekking and power hiking.  This will really help you spend more time on your feet without over training and allow you to still train WELL during the week – this is key.  The big mistake people make is doing too many long runs, too fast and therefore, are too tired to do the other key, faster runs during the week. So they ultimately morph into running slower and really tired.  
 
SITNF:
15. What kind of strength training, if any, do you do?
ERIC:
I believe athletic foundation begins at the feet.  Our ability and health starts there and we must train this foundation. So I training my feet constantly thru unique exercises I have develop that also attack my entire leg strength and power.  I also perform 2-4 days of upper body strength that continues on the philosophy of training the body as one unit.  For example, the tightness in our pecs, effects how well we breath and use our arms during running.  We can develop this upper body muscle equilibrium just as we can with our lower body and it all effects how well we run, positively or negatively. I am also a climber, so I do a lot of bouldering at home and at the rock gym that also develops a lot of strength for me.
 
SITNF:
16. I find that as I transition into marathon training, I have lots of stiffness in my upper thoracic spine during my long runs. Are there any specific stretches or strengthening exercises that you might recommend to help with this?
ERIC:
My entire strength program will attack this, as it is so important. Many of the exercises I have developed, so it is hard to explain what to do because you will not recognize the name of the exercise.  But one good one that you might be what I call toes to chest, or piking your body with your feet/toes on a fit ball.  Simply get into a push up position with your toes positioned on top of a fit ball. In this position, pull your toes towards you while keeping your legs straight, butt high in the air (pike).  This will help develop the stability and strength in your upper back and shoulders, helping to take stress and tightness away from your pecs – which is causing the problem.
Also just laying face up on a fit ball extending your arms behind you to the floor and keeping your legs straight will help that area and it will feel good, but this will not address the problem, strength will.
Another thing to really work on is relaxing your upper body while you run.  Swing your arms BACK behind you more while you run. To help with this, perform short fast pick-ups during your long runs that force you to swing your arms for power – be relaxed but powerful.
 
SITNF:
17. Where is your favorite place to run?
ERIC:
Hands down, the Tetons.  They are so beautiful and so accessible.  The trails here in Jackson Hole are world-class that also offer great wildlife opportunities and the mountains make everyone a world-class photographer.  It is the true Wild West.  But having said that, I have traveled enough to know there are so many unique places to run. Another favorite in Moab and the Grand Canyon.
 
SITNF:
18. There’s no shortage of running gadgets out there. Do you use any of them and if you do, which do you recommend?
ERIC:
I am a big heart rate and GPS user for myself and all of my athletes. All of my workouts are designed either by heart rate or speed training zones, so this is the one piece of equipment I require. It is also a great way to learn and bring awareness to your running. To support my website, I have started to do more photo and video blogging so I now take a camera and GoPro wherever I run.  
 
SITNF:
19. Where’s the most exotic place you’ve ever run?
ERIC:
I would have to say Hong Kong and the Lantau Trail.  Having the contrast of a huge, huge megalopolis city and in the matter of a taxi ride you are out on amazing trails leading to the Big Buddha and monastery at the top of the mountain with views of the Island and water. Part of it for me was I just never imagined I would ever be running in Hong Kong, adding to this the history of the area and being so far removed from home really just makes this a very special place for me.
From a true adventure standpoint I have to say Nicaragua is right up there. Running there was so different than what I am used to.  I have never run up an active volcano before, or running with howling monkeys in the trees while navigating thru a jungle. There are not too many places like Nicaragua and that is pretty easy to travel to.
 
SITNF:
20. Do you ever take an extended break from running during the year to recharge your batteries (more than just a day or two)?
ERIC:
Oh yes, this is required to get stronger and come back rejuvenated physically and mentally. During Nov I will take about a month off and purposefully get a little reconditioned from running.  I also climb, bike and ski during the winter which gives me some diversity and keeps things fresh.
 
SITNF:
21. When you’re not running and going on exotic adventures, what do you like to do to relax?
ERIC:
As much as I love adventure, I am also very good at relaxing.  I am a big believer in developing goals with visualization techniques and also as a way to relax and use music to help with this.  I love to read and learn, so I always have 4-5 books going at a time, which now doesn’t sound too relaxing!!!
My daughter is a climber, so I do a lot of Daddy/daughter time training and climbing with her.  And of course, nothing gets much better than that morning espresso staring and dreaming out the window.
 
SITNF:
22. Do you ever run with music? Why or why not?
ERIC:
I enjoy music just as much as running, but I very rarely run with music. I am kind of a minimalist when it comes to this. I hate carrying much “stuff” and hate wearing ear buds, and ultimately I enjoy hearing nature and my surroundings.  If I lived in an urban setting, I might feel differently.
I use music when visualizing and establishing goals.
 
SITNF:
23. If you do run with music, what do you listen to?
ERIC:
Right now listening to Sinead O’Connor’s and Pearl Jam’s new music. The last Foo Fighter’s album is a must and always The Clash!
 
SITNF:
24. Some runners reward themselves after certain goals are met. Do you have any specific ways you “reward” yourself or is reaching a goal its on reward?
ERIC:
I really enjoy and get excited about creating a project and seeing it thru.  For me I sometimes enjoy this planning and the actually training more than the achievement itself.  Therefore my reward is to start another project and maybe a cold New Castle.
 
SITNF:
25. Do you have any tips on injury prevention?
ERIC:
Yes, foot strength.  It is so potent but so easy to do that doesn’t take time away from running.  It is the one thing that will be new to everyone and help prevent injuries and eliminate the tightness we experience as runners.   Working on run form will also help as will spending some runs in a natural or minimal shoe to help develop good muscle equilibrium and strength while running.  Run technique is the proper utilization of strength, therefore, every time we take a running step, we have the opportunity to layer on good strength and muscle usage.
 
SITNF:
26. Some people think that running is bad for your knees and causes arthritis even though recent studies show that running is actually good for your knees. What advice do you have for older runners that are just starting out and have some degree of arthritis in their knees.
ERIC:
Well, I would first say to be sure it is arthritis that you have.  I have talked with many people who say they have arthritis, but it is self diagnosed based on aches and pains they feel and assume is arthritis, but is not.  But if it is arthritis, this is the time where you really need to listen to your body and I would employ the philosophy of running less, but more often as the body allows.  Consistency is so important, and this frequency, not duration is the key.
But I also have to go back to foot strength, run form and good shoes.  The idea with all of this is to training your body to operate more efficiently, and this will help everyone.  The more you can recruit other muscles to help support the arthritic area the better.
If you are just starting out, I would really try and stay away from a built up shoe that has a lot of stability built in. This will not help the knees, look for a natural shoe to promotes stabilization at the feet, which will help stabilize the knees naturally and recruit other muscles to help out.
 
SITNF:
27. In your opinion, how much is too much as far as running goes?
ERIC:
I have done a lot of research on this based on historical records and for elites it has been shown that a weekly volume of 90-120 miles reaps the greatest return and anything beyond that is diminished returns.  For the age group runner, that is such a hard question to answer because everyone is so different. So I will answer it this way. I feel running begins to be too much when we are obviously injured often OR when running loses its appeal and it becomes something we feel we have to do, versus want to do.  Be aware of what you are doing, how you perform and if you start to see a drastic decline in performance physically or mentally, it might be good to take some time off.
 
SITNF:
28. Where is your dream location to run or have your already visited that place?
ERIC:
I really want to get to the Alps very soon to explore similar mountains to what I am used to hear in Jackson, but with the Euro flare.  And I am currently putting together a high alpine run project for the Himalayas, which would be that dream !!  And then on Mars.  Wouldn’t it be cool to be the first to run on Mars!?
 
SITNF:
30. What are your ideal running conditions?  What are your plans for the future?
ERIC:
I love running mountains, so my perfect day is starting out in the cool air with blue skies and following a canyon up high to a divide or to the summit peak, maybe with a little bit of a rock climb or scramble to wake up the brain to send the peak.
I have a lot of projects brewing that all revolves around my own “cool Impossible” mission of global running and one runner per household.  This goal is two-fold.  One, it is meant for me to lead by example of what the cool impossible really means, a huge goal and it doesn’t get much bigger than one runner per household.  I want runners and readers of The Cool Impossible to see my goal and understand it is not so much about the outcome, but the “cool” things and amazing things that come to us thru the process of living this cool impossible. Too many of us are stopped by fear because before we start a goal, we want to know what the outcome will be.  We ask, can I do it, what will happen, will I succeed?  Well, that is impossible to know until we live our goal day to day.  So, this need to know will stop us before we even start and our actions or lack of actions are being decided on something that is impossible to know.  
So yes, one runner per household.  My passion and mission in life is to use running as a vehicle to help people live the life THEY WANT.  When people are empowered to live the life they truly want, they eat better, they take care of their body, they treat others with respect and compassion, and become just a little bit more open-minded to other beliefs.  Thru running, we can create a healthier and better world.  And running is something most all of us can do.
Right now I am putting together a team to help me with this campaign and mission.  There is a great Ted Talk out there about starting a movement and the overriding point is when starting a movement, you need help and others to help carry the torch.  As a coach, it is sometimes hard to ask for help and it is tricky to find the right kind of help to keep this an authentic and organic movement. Right now my focus is on building my website community, continue to coach my athletes, and eventually encourage my fan base to become ambassadors for this global running movement.  I have a few projects brewing that hopefully will include a TV/digital media platform for my message.  And, I am in the process of putting together partners and sponsors to help me travel and show how adventurous running can be and give it a “face lift” to the general public.   
 
SITNF:
31. Any last words of advice/wisdom for my readers?
ERIC:
Yes, commit fully to your running in your own way.  Do it for yourself and give yourself the permission to do this.  Find balance with it in your life, but it is OK to do it for yourself. It is not selfish and if you allow this full commitment great things will happen that you would never ever dreamed might happen and you will become an inspiration to others and ultimately, this is the most selfless act.  Embrace the fear that comes with this, and see that fear is necessary to live your own personal way.  Fear is telling you, you are on the right path.  Trust the process and demand the impossible!
 
SITNF: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer my questions! I hope I’ll get the chance to run with you again sometime soon!
THANK YOU Gina – these were great questions and I hope I was not too long winded.
Thanks again – E

Eric and ZOZI are teaming up to give away a dream adventure trip to Nicaragua that he’s helped them to design so be sure to go to ZOZI’s site and enter to win!!! You don’t want to miss out on this adventure! 

Eric with my husband and me in 2011 on the Born to Run book tour.

Eric with my husband and me in 2011 on the Born to Run book tour.

You can also find Eric on: Facebook & Twitter

You can also connect with ZOZI on Facebook & Twitter

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Filed under Books, Featured Runner, Giveaways, Nutrition, Racing, Running

Hug a Runner Day 2013 and Running the Edge Book Giveaway!


hugarunnerdayIt’s time to G.O. H.A.R.D.  

This year’s annual Globally Organized Hug A Runner Day celebration will be the biggest yet!

Are you ready to Share the Sweat?

November 20, 2013 is going to be a HUGE celebration!

Runners of all styles, ages, genders, speeds, sizes, and ethnicities will unite in an embrace as we celebrate the Third Annual Hug a Runner Day!  Every runner deserves a hug. A real hug. The kind of hug that says, “Even if I don’t understand why you do it, I appreciate and recognize your effort.”
We are adding several new twists to the celebration this year as we wrap our arms around cross country runners, track runners, road racers, walkers, joggers, and sloggers. Nothing shows our unity better than a great big sweaty hug! 

What’s new this year?

1.  Giveaways all over Facebook: See the list below and join our event page for more details.

2.  Event in Portland:  There has never been a fun run like this one!  Click here to read about the First Annual G.O. H.A.R.D. Fun Run sponsored by Fit Right.

3.  Group Run Contest:  Read about our fun run, and then help organize or create something similar in your community. We are going to visit the town with the biggest/most spirited celebration some time in 2014!!

4.  Cool New Shirts:  Get your Official G.O. H.A.R.D. shirts now!

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4 Ways To Participate Before The Event:

1. Practice hugging as many runners as possible.

2. Go to the Hug a Runner event page on Facebook and click the blue “Join” button.  Don’t forget to invite your friends!

3. Follow these pages. At least one of these Facebook pages will be giving away free stuff every single day leading up to the event:  Distant Runners, Runner Unleashed, Ultra Moms on a Mission, Running Through Chaos, Run Like a Girl, I Run to Drink, Run Hard Always Finish, Run Junkees, Slow is the New Fast, No Limits Running, Dare to Be Different, and Life in the Day of a Runner.

4. Share this blog or write your own. If you have a blog, you have permission to use anything you find on this post.

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This is me hugging one of my favorite runners….my son, Zach!

4 Ways To Participate On November 20th:

1. Wear running shoes all day long. If possible, wear an old race bib.  If you see someone wearing these items, run up and give them a hug!

2. Organize a group hug with your training group. Send us a picture of your G.O. H.A.R.D. celebration.  The pic with the most spirit/creativity/people will be visited by us Adam Goucher and Tim Catalano in 2014!!  More details to follow.

3. Send every runner you know a virtual hug by enclosing their names in double brackets like this ((Adam and Tim)).

4. Commit random acts of hugging.

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I’m so excited to announce that I will be giving away an autographed copy of the book Running the Edge by Adam Goucher and Tim Catalano!!  Don’t forget to check out their Facebook page here!

Want a chance to win?

Click the link below to enter!! 

Rafflecopter giveaway

Good luck and don’t forget to G.O. H.A.R.D. on November 2oth!!!

{{{{HUGS!!}}}}

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Filed under Books, Giveaways, Hug A Runner Day, Running

Trust Your Intuition Official Book Release


 

I am so excited to officially announce that I am a contributor in a newly published book: Trust Your Intuition 25 “Natural Medicine Confessions” from Influential Women Who Use Healing Remedies For Their Families! It will be released July 17, 2013. There are 24 other women besides me, who have also contributed, and we each share a story of why we chose to use natural alternatives for a health issue or challenge in our homes.

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 In this book, there are situations that these women have encountered and they have shared how they have used natural medicine to resolve the problem.

My chapter is about Chia Seeds and how I use these tiny, nutritional powerhouses to fuel my running. I also discuss how I lost weight through running and making healthy changes to my diet.

I am amazed at the powerful other stories in the book. I would like to introduce you to a few of the other contributors as we get ready to launch the book.

Entire Book Cover Trust Your Intuition-web

Author Spotlights

jenni

Jenni Wilson, Natural Medicine Mom, is a master herbalist, wife of an ER doctor and mother to 7 children. She teaches women (and a few brave dads) how to use natural tools, and especially essential oils, to care for their families and enjoy more confidence, control and effectiveness in their home health care. She is an author, speaker and blogger at Natural Medicine Mom.

katie

Tens of thousands of health-conscious women have learned from Katie’s expertise to embrace the Wellness Mama lifestyle. She has helped clients lose weight, increase athletic performance, improve fertility, and more. She shares many of her valuable tips for using natural tools for healing in the book.

rachel

 One of the amazing women contributing to my book is Rachel Parrish. Rachel is a mother to 2 children and a wife to a wellness doctor. Her passions are faith, family and health. She supports her husband in helping to change the way people look at their health and uses her blog, Day2Day Joys, as a tool to do that. In her chapter of the book you will be able to learn more about how to maximize your living.

corrinne

Corinne is a successful, fashion designing mom and an inspiration to so many people who are fed up with traditional medicine. Being a child of excessive exposure to antibiotics, her immune system suffered. She empowered herself by seeking help and guidance from natural remedies experts, educated herself on various techniques, and has been able to keep her family the healthiest they have ever been. From Corinne’s chapter she will tell you how she got back her immune system and shares her exclusive recipe for infection fighting. Her website is Persnickety Clothing.

Stay tuned for more details as the release date gets closer! Also, there will be free gifts available when the book is ordered on July 17th!

For more information, you can check out Jenni’s website: Natural Medicine Mom .

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Filed under Blogging, Books, Family, Nutrition